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12 Months ago | 2.3 mins read

THE DEVELOPMENT STACK

by Karen Webs

Wednesday, 29th Aug 2018 | 01:09:01 PM

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Each competing language has its own strong attributes and lesser attributes in comparison to the other but ultimately – it all comes down to the abilities of a developer at any given tool.

I blog routinely on Wednesdays – but not every Wednesday happens to coincide with my birthday and as if that is not reason enough for calling for a celebration – today also marks my 20th blog post since I embarked on this weekly blogging schedule. Now that I have gotten that excitement out of the way, today’s article is going to give you an insight of what a development stack is because the more you know about it – you will be able to make more informed decisions when you go shopping for a website.

First things first – what is a development stack?

In web and software development, a stack is the combination of all the tools that a developer uses to create a website, a web app, or a software product. There are different types of development tools used within a project for different goals – some are used to create the structure, some are used to connect with the database, others are used to control the program, and they all affect the overall performance of a website or software application.

That said – there are a lot of competing tools in web development and this tends to bring about ‘a war of tools’ within the development community with developers being divided along the tools they use. Different developers will for example use different programming languages to achieve the same objective – like let’s say we want developers to build us a calculator – some developers will use PHP, some will use PYTHON, others will use JAVA, others will use JAVASCRIPT, C, C++, C#, GO, MOJOLICIOUS, PERL, HASKELL, and the list is endless – and those are just a sample of server-side languages; there are even wars on which databases to use and I do not intend to overwhelm you with all the different things that developers clash about.

In my honest opinion however – each competing language has its own strong attributes and lesser attributes in comparison to the other but ultimately – it all comes down to the abilities of a developer at any given tool. In that sense – shopping for an effective website then becomes more about finding an expert developer with a portfolio that matches the level of quality and efficiency that you expect for your project. Wondering how or where to find a developer with the right development stack for your website? Please contact me at info@karenwebs.com and I will be focused to turn your project into an achievement.

Do you have observations of your own to add to this subject? Please share them below in the comments to help empower each other. Was this article helpful? Please [url=https://www.karenwebs.com/Usign#righty]sign up[/url] to stay updated with our empowering conversations.

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